Check out the color of this lake. Thanks to one of my favorite photographers @horsepoor4ever / Damara Ann for this lesson in what makes the water turquoise. It's called Rock Flour or Glacial Flour and consists of silt-sized particles made by the glacial erosion that become suspended in melt-water. When the sediment enters a river, it turns grey to milky white, and if the river flows into a glacial lake, the lake may appear turquiose. Examples of this may be seen at Lake Louise in Canada or here at Big Pine Lakes in the John Muir Wilderness in the Sierra Nevada National Forest. Check out more of Damara Ann's photos on Instagram.

Check out the color of this lake. Thanks to one of my favorite photographers @horsepoor4ever / Damara Ann for this lesson in what makes the water turquoise. It's called Rock Flour or Glacial Flour and consists of silt-sized particles made by the glacial erosion that become suspended in melt-water. When the sediment enters a river, it turns grey to milky white, and if the river flows into a glacial lake, the lake may appear turquiose. Examples of this may be seen at Lake Louise in Canada or here at Big Pine Lakes in the John Muir Wilderness in the Sierra Nevada National Forest. Check out more of Damara Ann's photos on Instagram.

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